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All Things in Youth Sports

5 Things parents shouldn’t do to “help” with the recruiting process

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If you want your child to be successful in her college recruiting process, be an advisor – not an agent. Think twice before you:

  1. Send emails or call college coaches on behalf of your child. Your athlete needs to show that she is mature enough to be a part of a college program. That starts with her taking the initiative to contact and communicate with college coaches.
  2. Carry your athlete’s bag(s) to and from the field, especially at events where college coaches will be in attendance. If your 15-year-old relies on her dad to schlep bags, it sends a message of “royalty” instead of “scrappy and resourceful.”
  3. Lose track of the most important objective in this process – your child pursuing a solid education. and being prepared for a job and life after graduation.
  4. Measure your player’s college opportunity by a scholarship offer alone. A scholarship offer may feel really good, but if she has an opportunity to play at one of her top choices without initial financial help, more variables should be included in the decision process, such as academic opportunity, coach and program reputation.
  5. Rely on someone else to do the research and communication between the player and the college coach. Your child needs to spend time looking at schools and sports programs to determine more about what is a good fit for her.
Motivate your player to:
  • research schools, programs and majors;
  • email coaches herself;
  • get advice from others in her community about her playing and academic aspirations;
  • encourage her club or high school coach be the point of contact between the college coach and her.
If she is motivated to play in college, her actions and maturity will be noticed by college coaches.

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